BAUTISTA Julius | 京都大学 東南アジア地域研究研究所

BAUTISTA Julius

職名: Associate Professor

MAIL: bautista [at] cseas.kyoto-u.ac.jp

研究部門

社会共生研究部門

専門分野

Anthropology, Southeast Asian Studies, Religious Studies

研究関心

Anthropology of Religion, Pedagogy, Southeast Asian Culture and History




Julius BAUTISTA is Associate Professor at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University, Japan. He was previously a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore. He received a PhD. in Southeast Asian Studies (anthropology and cultural history) at the Australian National University, and has subsequently published on religious practice in Asia, with a focus on Christian iconography, religious piety, and the relationship between religion and the state particularly in the Philippines and Timor Leste. He is author of “Figuring Catholicism: An Ethnohistory of the Santo Niño de Cebu” (Ateneo, 2010), editor of “The Spirit of Things: Materiality and Religious Diversity in Southeast Asia” (Cornell SEAP, 2012), co-editor (with Francis Lim) of Christianity and the State in Asia: Complicity and Conflict (Routledge, 2009), and author of “The Way of the Cross: Suffering Selfhoods in the Roman Catholic Philippines” (Hawaii, 2019).

Personal URL: https://kyoto-u.academia.edu/JuliusBautista

  • Julius Bautista is author of Figuring Catholicism: An Ethnohistory of the Santo Niño de Cebu (Ateneo, 2010, a finalist for the Philippine National Book Prize for the Social Sciences), editor of The Spirit of Things: Materiality and Religious Diversity in Southeast Asia (Cornell SEAP, 2012) and co-editor (with Francis Lim) of Christianity and the State in Asia: Complicity and Conflict (Routledge, 2009). His works have also appeared in journals such as The Australian Journal of Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Asian Studies Review, Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia, the Asian Journal of Social Science and Pedagogies, among others.

  • Julius Bautista’s current research project is an analysis of the separation of Church and State in the Philippines and East Timor. A comparative anthropological and historical methodology is used in pursuing three research components: (1) a pioneering synthesis of relevant scholarly literature from the two areas, (2) a historical analysis of the role of Catholic institutions in state-formation and (3) an ethnographic analysis of faith and ritual as a factor in ordinary people’s political participation.